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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Cortical control of eye movements found in the catalog.

Cortical control of eye movements

Pieter Lauwerens Latour

Cortical control of eye movements

by Pieter Lauwerens Latour

  • 88 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Institute for Perception RVO-TNO, National Defence Research Organization TNO in Soesterberg, Netherlands .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Eye -- Movements.,
  • Vision.

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[by] P. L. Latour.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQP476 .L33
    The Physical Object
    Pagination108 p.
    Number of Pages108
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5652173M
    LC Control Number68092227

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW This review focuses on eye movement control by the cerebral cortex, mainly in humans. Data have emerged based on the important contribution of recent techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging, which provide complementary results to those of the classical lesion and electrical stimulation studies.   Disturbances in eye movements can provide important clues for localization of neurological damage. The role of the frontal eye fields in horizontal gaze is stressed. The need to coordinate cranial.

    Three antagonistic pairs of muscles control eye movement: the lateral and medial rectus muscles, the superior and inferior rectus muscles, and the superior and inferior oblique muscles. These muscles are responsible for movement of the eye along three different axes: horizontal, either toward the nose (adduction) or away from the nose (abduction); vertical, either elevation or depression; and torsional, . been correlated to diverse cortical functions. In this document, you will find an overview of the -Horizontal saccadic eye movements Somatosensory-Kinesthetic perception of limb movements of movement and control of proximal and trunk muscles of the Size: KB.

    Purchase Using Eye Movements as an Experimental Probe of Brain Function, Volume - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN , Despite extensive research, the functions of the basal ganglia (BG) in movement control have not been fully understood. Eye movements, particularly saccades, are convenient indicators of BG function. Here, we review the main oculomotor findings reported in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and genetic parkinsonian syndromes. PD is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder caused by dopaminergic cell Cited by:


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Cortical control of eye movements by Pieter Lauwerens Latour Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cortical control of eye movements Paperback – January 1, See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback, "Please retry" — — — Paperback — Escape from Virtual Island Manufacturer: Institute for Perception RVO-TNO, National Defence Research Organization TNO.

The cortical control of visually guided saccadic eye movements is accomplished through two major interactive systems, the anterior and the posterior. The posterior system from the occipital and parietal cortices reaches the brain stem oculomotor centers through the.

The frontal eye field can thus control eye movements by activating selected populations of superior colliculus neurons. This cortical area also projects directly to the contralateral PPRF; as a result, the frontal eye field can also control eye movements independently of the superior by: This chapter uses eye movements as a model system to investigate how midbrain reflex circuits and frontal and parietal systems for eye movement control combine to produce goal-directed behavior.

Converging evidence from patients with midbrain lesions and from hemianopic patients reveals that midbrain pathways are responsible for reflexive orienting in humans. Eye movements are controlled by a circuit that is more complex than usual in the central nervous system.

Cortical control of conjugate eye movements involves the inferior parietal lobe, the frontal eye field and the dorsolateral pré-frontal córtex. All control the cerebellum and pontine nucleii, via the superior colliculi. Cortical control of reaching movements Kalaska, Scott, Cisek and Sergio the retinal location of stimuli and a multiplicative gain signal covarying with the orbital position of the eyes [4”].

Recently. the converging signals have been expanded to include auditory and vestibular inputs, and gain fields co.

Eye movements: functional domains and control systems. Hoffmann KP, Distler C, Ilg U. Callosal and superior temporal sulcus contributions to receptive field properties in the macaque monkey’s nucleus of the optic tract and dorsal terminal nucleus of the accessory optic : Simon E. Skalicky. The Neurology of Eye Movements, edition 5, has two interrelated parts.

The first comprises a modern synthesis of the anatomical, physiological, and pharmacological substrate for eye movements, including current views on the reflexive and voluntary control of gaze.

This synthesis is based on electrophysiological and inactivation studies in Cited by: Chapter 8D - Control of Eye Movements Types of eye movements. Although the eyes can be moved voluntarily, most eye movements are through reflexes.

The principal types of movement include voluntary motion (both vertical and horizontal), tracking (both. The neural circuits that control eye movements are complex and distributed in brainstem, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and multiple areas of cortex.

The anatomical function of the substrates implicated in eye movements has been studied for decades in numerous countries, laboratories, and by: Diffuse groups of neurons in the pretectal region (upper midbrain) coordinate muscles acting in vertical eye movement.

Effects of damage to frontal eye field or occipital cortex have on vision Damage to the frontal eye field means that gaze cannot voluntarily be directed to the other side. therefore, at rest, the direction of gaze is fixed towards the side of the lesion.

G. Lekwuwa, G. Barnes, Cerebral control of eye movements: I. The relationship between cerebral lesion sites and smooth pursuit deficits, Brain, VolumeIssue 2, bi-directional deficit resulted from lesions that penetrated into the underlying/adjacent white matter from the frontal eye field, posterior parietal cortex and thalamus Cited by: The long-term goal of this laboratory is to understand the contributions made by the primate's cerebral cortex to the control of motor behavior.

Experiments are focused on the role of the rhesus monke. This new edition comprises a modern synthesis of the anatomical, physiological, and pharmacological substrate for eye movements, including current views on the reflexive and voluntary control of gaze.

This synthesis is based on electrophysiological and inactivation studies in macaque, and behavioural studies in humans that incorporate functional imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

the latest advances in our knowledge of the control of human eye movements at the cortical level. The roles of some areas located in the frontal lobe, the parietal lobe and the cingulate cortex will be reviewed, successively, before a brief concluding overview of the.

■ The abducens nucleus (VI), at the pontine level, controls all ipsilateral eye movements, with abduction mediated via the abducens rootlets and adduction via the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF).Author: Charles Pierrot-Deseilligny. Eye movement control by the cerebral cortex Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in Current Opinion in Neurology 17(1) March with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

the control of eye movements in human readers. The model couples processes of oculomotor control and cognition in a realistic cortical circuit of spiking neurons. A global rule that signals either “reading” or. Contralateral hemiparesis. 1) CST fibers passing through pons decussates in medulla and innervate contralateral half of the body.

Contralateral gaze preference. 2) Away from the side of the lesion (Because FEF pathway from opposite cortex is interrupted). The caudal parts of the frontal eye fields contain neurons that discharge during smooth-pursuit. Recent results have provided a new understanding of the roles of the frontal eye field pursuit area and suggest that it may control the gain of pursuit eye movements, code predictive visual signals that drive pursuit, and code commands for smooth Cited by:.

The eyes have it – how eye movements are affected by posterior cortical atrophy By Tim Shakespeare on 29 April 1 Many different systems and structures come together to give us a rich visual experience of the world around us.

Based on the findings from lesion, imaging and stimulation studies, human FEF, which are thought to lie at the caudal end of the middle frontal gyrus, 6 – 9 are known to control contralateral versive eye movements, including saccades and smooth by: The Frontal Eye Field Is the Primary Cortical Area for Controlling Gaze Movements.

The frontal eye field (FEF) exerts its control on gaze movements through several descending pathways, including a direct projection to the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus, an indirect projection to the superior colliculus via the basal ganglia, and also projections to the cerebellum and the brainstem reticular .